ASSEMBLY, No. 3863

STATE OF NEW JERSEY

214th LEGISLATURE

 

INTRODUCED FEBRUARY 22, 2011

 


 

Sponsored by:

Assemblywoman  ANNETTE QUIJANO

District 20 (Union)

 

 

 

 

SYNOPSIS

     Allows person with penicillin allergy to voluntarily make notation on drivers license.

 

CURRENT VERSION OF TEXT

     As introduced.

  


An Act concerning drivers licenses and supplementing Title 39 of the Revised Statutes. 

 

     Be It Enacted by the Senate and General Assembly of the State of New Jersey:

 

     1.    a.  The Chief Administrator of the New Jersey Motor Vehicle Commission shall provide with every new license, renewal license, identification card or renewal identification card the opportunity for a person to voluntarily designate that the person is allergic to penicillin, and as a result, may be susceptible to an adverse reaction to the medication if treated with penicillin following a motor vehicle accident. 

     b.    The designation indicating that a person suffers from a penicillin allergy pursuant to subsection a. of this section shall be done in accordance with procedures prescribed by the chief administrator.  The designation shall be displayed in print in a conspicuous form and manner on the license or identification card by the following statement: “ALLERGIC TO PENICILLIN.” The designation shall be used exclusively to inform any law enforcement official or emergency medical professional that a person suffers from an allergy to penicillin and should not be treated with penicillin if that person has been incapacitated or is otherwise unable to communicate as a result of an injury suffered following an accident. 

 

     2.    This act shall take effect on the first day of the thirteenth month following enactment.

 

 

STATEMENT

 

     This bill requires the Motor Vehicle Commission (MVC), to allow a person who suffers from an allergy to penicillin to voluntarily make a notation on his or her drivers license that conspicuously states: “ALLERGIC TO PENICILLIN.”  The notation is to be used solely to inform any law enforcement official or emergency medical professional that a person suffers from an allergy to penicillin, and should not be treated with penicillin if that person has been incapacitated due to an accident. 

     Approximately 5.4 million people in the United States suffer from an allergy to penicillin.  The most serious allergic reaction to penicillin is an anaphylactic response, which develops immediately after penicillin exposure and can be life-threatening.