SENATE, No. 2327

STATE OF NEW JERSEY

214th LEGISLATURE

 

INTRODUCED OCTOBER 7, 2010

 


 

Sponsored by:

Senator  JEFF VAN DREW

District 1 (Cape May, Atlantic and Cumberland)

 

 

 

 

SYNOPSIS

     Provides public servant is guilty of official misconduct if he knowingly obtains, arranges or provides “no-show” job for himself or another.

 

CURRENT VERSION OF TEXT

     As introduced.

  


An Act providing public servant is guilty of official misconduct if he obtains, arranges or provides a “no-show” job for himself or another and amending N.J.S.2C:30-2.

 

     Be It Enacted by the Senate and General Assembly of the State of New Jersey:

 

     1.    N.J.S.2C:30-2 is amended to read as follows:

     2C:30-2  A public servant is guilty of official misconduct when, with purpose to obtain a benefit for himself or another or to injure or to deprive another of a benefit:

     a.     He commits an act relating to his office but constituting an unauthorized exercise of his official functions, knowing that such act is unauthorized or he is committing such act in an unauthorized manner; or

     b.    He knowingly refrains from performing a duty which is imposed upon him by law or is clearly inherent in the nature of his office; or

     c.     He knowingly obtains, arranges or provides for himself or another a compensated position or public office that requires little or no actual attendance or work.

     Official misconduct is a crime of the second degree.  If the benefit obtained or sought to be obtained, or of which another is deprived or sought to be deprived, is of a value of $200.00 or less, the offense of official misconduct is a crime of the third degree.

(cf:  P.L.1979, c.178, s.61).

 

     2.    This act shall take effect immediately.

 

 

STATEMENT

 

     This bill addresses the issue of “no-show” public jobs.  It provides that knowingly obtains, arranges or provides for himself or another a compensated position or public office that requires little or no actual attendance or work.

     Official misconduct is a crime of the second degree, except that if the benefit at issue is valued at $200 or less official misconduct is a crime of the third degree.  A crime of the second degree is punishable by up to ten years imprisonment and a fine of up to 150,000.  A crime of the second degree is punishable by up to five years imprisonment and a fine of up to $15,000.