SENATE, No. 2628

STATE OF NEW JERSEY

216th LEGISLATURE

 

INTRODUCED DECEMBER 8, 2014

 


 

Sponsored by:

Senator  THOMAS H. KEAN, JR.

District 21 (Morris, Somerset and Union)

Senator  JOSEPH M. KYRILLOS, JR.

District 13 (Monmouth)

 

Co-Sponsored by:

Senator Bateman

 

 

 

 

SYNOPSIS

     Ends the estate tax and increases the gross income tax’s retirement income exclusions.

 

CURRENT VERSION OF TEXT

     As introduced.

  


An Act ending the estate tax and increasing the gross income tax retirement income exclusions by amending R.S.54:38-1, N.J.S.54A:6-10, and P.L.1977, c.273.

 

     Be It Enacted by the Senate and General Assembly of the State of New Jersey:

 

     1.    R.S.54:38-1 is amended to read as follows:

     54:38-1.  a.  The estate tax imposed pursuant to this section shall not apply to the transfer of an estate of a resident decedent dying on or after the July 1 first occurring on or after the date of enactment of P.L.    , c.    (pending before the Legislature as this bill).

     In addition to the inheritance, succession or legacy taxes imposed by this State under authority of chapters 33 to 36 of this title (R.S.54:33-1 et seq.), or hereafter imposed under authority of any subsequent enactment, there is hereby imposed an estate or transfer tax:

     (1) Upon the transfer of the estate of every resident decedent dying before January 1, 2002 which is subject to an estate tax payable to the United States under the provisions of the federal revenue act of one thousand nine hundred and twenty-six and the amendments thereof and supplements thereto or any other federal revenue act in effect as of the date of death of the decedent, the amount of which tax shall be the sum by which the maximum credit allowable against any federal estate tax payable to the United States under any federal revenue act on account of taxes paid to any state or territory of the United States or the District of Columbia, shall exceed the aggregate amount of all estate, inheritance, succession or legacy taxes actually paid to any state or territory of the United States or the District of Columbia, including inheritance, succession or legacy taxes actually paid this State, in respect to any property owned by such decedent or subject to such taxes as a part of or in connection with the estate; and

     (2) (a) Upon the transfer of the estate of every resident decedent dying after December 31, 2001 which would have been subject to an estate tax payable to the United States under the provisions of the federal Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (26 U.S.C. s.1 et seq.), in effect on December 31, 2001, the amount of which tax shall be, at the election of the person or corporation liable for the payment of the tax under this chapter, either

     (i) the maximum credit that would have been allowable under the provisions of that federal Internal Revenue Code in effect on that date against the federal estate tax that would have been payable under the provisions of that federal Internal Revenue Code in effect on that date on account of taxes paid to any state or territory of the United States or the District of Columbia,

or

     (ii) determined pursuant to the simplified tax system as may be prescribed by the Director of the Division of Taxation in the Department of the Treasury to produce a liability similar to the liability determined pursuant to clause (i) of this paragraph reduced pursuant to paragraph (b) of this subsection.

     (b) The amount of tax liability determined pursuant to subparagraph (a) of this paragraph shall be reduced by the aggregate amount of all estate, inheritance, succession or legacy taxes actually paid to any state or territory of the United States or the District of Columbia, including inheritance, succession or legacy taxes actually paid this State, in respect to any property owned by such decedent or subject to such taxes as a part of or in connection with the estate; provided however, that the amount of the reduction shall not exceed the proportion of the tax otherwise due under this subsection that the amount of the estate's property subject to tax by other jurisdictions bears to the entire estate taxable under this chapter.

     b. (1) In the case of the estate of a decedent dying before January 1, 2002 where no inheritance, succession or legacy tax is due this State under the provisions of chapters 33 to 36 of this title or under authority of any subsequent enactment imposing taxes of a similar nature, but an estate tax is due the United States under the provisions of any federal revenue act in effect as of the date of death, wherein provision is made for a credit on account of taxes paid the several states or territories of the United States, or the District of Columbia, the tax imposed by this chapter shall be the maximum amount of such credit less the aggregate amount of such estate, inheritance, succession or legacy taxes actually paid to any state or territory of the United States or the District of Columbia.

     (2) In the case of the estate of a decedent dying after December 31, 2001 where no inheritance, succession or legacy tax is due this State under the provisions of chapters 33 to 36 of this title or under authority of any subsequent enactment imposing taxes of a similar nature, the tax imposed by this chapter shall be determined pursuant to paragraph (2) of subsection a. of this section.

     c. For the purposes of this section, a “simplified tax system” to produce a liability similar to the liability determined pursuant to clause (i) of subparagraph (a) of paragraph (2) of subsection a. of this section is a tax system that is based upon the $675,000 unified estate and gift tax applicable exclusion amount in effect under the provisions of the federal Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (26 U.S.C. s.1 et seq.), in effect on December 31, 2001, and results in general in the determination of a similar amount of tax but which will enable the person or corporation liable for the payment of the tax to calculate an amount of tax notwithstanding the lack or paucity of information for compliance due to such factors as the absence of an estate valuation made for federal estate tax purposes, the absence of a measure of the impact of gifts made during the lifetime of the decedent in the absence of federal gift tax information, and any other information compliance problems as the director determines are the result of the phased repeal of the federal estate tax.

(cf: P.L.2002, c.31, s.1)

 

     2.    N.J.S.54A:6-10 is amended to read as follows:

     54A:6-10.  Pensions and annuities.  Gross income shall not include that part of any amount received as an annuity under an annuity, endowment, or life insurance contract which bears the same ratio to such amount as the investment in the contract as of the annuity starting date bears to the expected return under the contract as of such date.  Where (1) part of the consideration for an annuity, endowment, or life insurance contract is contributed by the employer, and (2) during the three-year period beginning on the date on which an amount is first received under the contract as an annuity, the aggregate amount receivable by the employee under the terms of the contract is equal to or greater than the consideration for the contract contributed by the employee, then all amounts received as an annuity under the contract shall be excluded from gross income until there has been so excluded an amount equal to the consideration for the contract contributed by the employee.

     In addition to that part of any amount received as an annuity which is excludable from gross income as herein provided, gross income shall not include payments:

     for taxable years beginning before January 1, 2000, of up to $10,000 for a married couple filing jointly, $5,000 for a married person filing separately, or $7,500 for an individual filing as a single taxpayer or an individual determining tax pursuant to subsection a. of N.J.S.54A:2-1;

     for the taxable year beginning on or after January 1, 2000, but before January 1, 2001, of up to $12,500 for a married couple filing jointly, $6,250 for a married person filing separately, or $9,375 for an individual filing as a single taxpayer or an individual determining tax pursuant to subsection a. of N.J.S.54A:2-1;

     for the taxable year beginning on or after January 1, 2001, but before January 1, 2002, of up to $15,000 for a married couple filing jointly, $7,500 for a married person filing separately, or $11,250 for an individual filing as a single taxpayer or an individual determining tax pursuant to subsection a. of N.J.S.54A:2-1;

     for the taxable year beginning on or after January 1, 2002, but before January 1, 2003, of up to $17,500 for a married couple filing jointly, $8,750 for a married person filing separately, or $13,125 for an individual filing as a single taxpayer or an individual determining tax pursuant to subsection a. of N.J.S.54A:2-1;

     for taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2003, but before the January 1 first following at least six full months beginning on or after the date of enactment of P.L.    , c.    (pending before the Legislature as this bill), of up to $20,000 for a married couple filing jointly, $10,000 for a married person filing separately, or $15,000 for an individual filing as a single taxpayer or an individual determining tax pursuant to subsection a. of  N.J.S.54A:2-1, and

     for taxable years beginning on or after the January 1 first following at least six full months beginning on or after the date of enactment of P.L.    , c.    (pending before the Legislature as this bill), of up to $30,000 for a married couple filing jointly, $15,000 for a married person filing separately, or $22,500 for an individual filing as a single taxpayer or an individual determining tax pursuant to subsection a. of  N.J.S.54A:2-1,

which are received as an annuity, endowment or life insurance contract, or payments of any such amounts which are received as pension, disability, or retirement benefits, under any public or private plan, whether the consideration therefor is contributed by the employee or employer or both, by any person who is 62 years of age or older or who, by virtue of disability, is or would be eligible to receive payments under the federal Social Security Act, but for taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2005, only if the taxpayer has gross income for the taxable year of not more than $100,000.

     Gross income shall not include any amount received under any public or private plan by reason of a permanent and total disability.

     Gross income shall not include distributions from an employees' trust described in section 401(a) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (hereinafter referred to as "the Code" ), which is exempt from tax under section 501(a) of the Code if the distribution, except the portion representing the employees' contributions, is rolled over in accordance with section 402(a)(5) or section 403(a)(4) of the Code.  The distribution shall be paid in one or more installments which constitute a lump-sum distribution within the meaning of section 402(e)(4)(A) (determined without reference to subsection (e)(4)(B)), or be on account of a termination of a plan of which the trust is a part or, in the case of a profit-sharing or stock bonus plan, a complete discontinuance of contributions under such plan.

(cf: P.L.2005, c.130, s.1)

 

     3.    Section 3 of P.L.1977, c.273 (C.54A:6-15) is amended to read as follows:

     3.    Other retirement income. a. Gross income shall not include income:

     for taxable years beginning before January 1, 2000, of up to $10,000 for a married couple filing jointly, $5,000 for a married person filing separately, or $7,500 for an individual filing as a single taxpayer or an individual determining tax pursuant to subsection a. of N.J.S.54A:2-1;

     for the taxable year beginning on or after January 1, 2000, but before January 1, 2001, of up to $12,500 for a married couple filing jointly, $6,250 for a married person filing separately, or $9,375 for an individual filing as a single taxpayer or an individual determining tax pursuant to subsection a. of N.J.S.54A:2-1;

     for the taxable year beginning on or after January 1, 2001, but before January 1, 2002, of up to $15,000 for a married couple filing jointly, $7,500 for a married person filing separately, or $11,250 for an individual filing as a single taxpayer or an individual determining tax pursuant to subsection a. of N.J.S.54A:2-1;

     for the taxable year beginning on or after January 1, 2002, but before January 1, 2003, of up to $17,500 for a married couple filing jointly, $8,750 for a married person filing separately, or $13,125 for an individual filing as a single taxpayer or an individual determining tax pursuant to subsection a. of N.J.S.54A:2-1;

     for taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2003, but before the January 1 first following at least six full months beginning on or after the date of enactment of P.L.    , c.    (pending before the Legislature as this bill), gross income shall not include income of up to $20,000 for a married couple filing jointly, $10,000 for a married person filing separately, or $15,000 for an individual filing as a single taxpayer or an individual determining tax pursuant to subsection a. of N.J.S.54A:2-1, and

     for taxable years beginning on or after the January 1 first following at least six full months beginning on or after the date of enactment of P.L.    , c.    (pending before the Legislature as this bill), gross income shall not include income of up to $30,000 for a married couple filing jointly, $15,000 for a married person filing separately, or $22,500 for an individual filing as a single taxpayer or an individual determining tax pursuant to subsection a. of N.J.S.54A:2-1,

when received in any tax year by a person aged 62 years or older who received no income in excess of $3,000 from one or more of the sources enumerated in subsections a., b., k. and p. of N.J.S.54A:5-1, but for taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2005, only if the taxpayer has gross income for the taxable year of not more than $100,000, provided, however, that the total exclusion under this subsection and that allowable under N.J.S.54A:6-10 shall not exceed the amounts of the exclusions set forth in this subsection.

     b.    In addition to the exclusion provided under N.J.S.54A:6-10 and subsection a. of this section, gross income shall not include income of up to $6,000 for a married couple filing jointly or an individual determining tax pursuant to subsection a. of N.J.S.54A:2-1, or $3,000 for a single person or a married person filing separately, who is not covered under N.J.S.54A:6-2 or N.J.S.54A:6-3, but who would be eligible in any year to receive payments under either section if he or she were covered thereby.

(cf: P.L.2005, c.130, s.2)

 

     4.    This act shall take effect immediately.

 

STATEMENT

 

     This bill ends the estate tax and increases the gross income tax’s retirement income exclusions.  The purpose of the bill is to make New Jersey a more tax-friendly retirement jurisdiction.

     At the technical level, the bill schedules the estate tax to conclude with the beginning of the first new State fiscal year coinciding or following the date of enactment.

     The bill increases the gross income tax’s retirement income exclusions as follows:

 

Taxpayer Status

Present Exclusion

Proposed Exclusion

Joint

$20,000

$30,000

Single

$15,000

$22,500

Married but Separate

$10,000

$15,000

 

The increases in retirement income exclusions are scheduled to apply to taxable years beginning on or after the January 1 within the first new State fiscal year coinciding or following the date of enactment.