SENATE JOINT RESOLUTION

No. 60

STATE OF NEW JERSEY

218th LEGISLATURE

 

INTRODUCED FEBRUARY 26, 2018

 


 

Sponsored by:

Senator  TROY SINGLETON

District 7 (Burlington)

Senator  DAWN MARIE ADDIEGO

District 8 (Atlantic, Burlington and Camden)

 

 

 

 

SYNOPSIS

     Designates January 11 of each year as “Alice Paul Day” in New Jersey.

 

 

CURRENT VERSION OF TEXT

     As introduced.

  


A Joint Resolution designating January 11 of each year as “Alice Paul Day” in New Jersey

 

Whereas, Born in Mt. Laurel New Jersey on January 11, 1885, Alice Paul was the leader of the movement to achieve women’s suffrage in the 20th century; and

Whereas, As a child, Alice Paul attended women’s suffrage meetings with her mother, who was a member of the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA); and

Whereas, In 1907, Alice Paul left the United States to study social work at the Woodbrooke Settlement in Birmingham, England, where she was influenced by Christabel and Emmeline Pankhurst, leaders of a passionate faction of suffragettes whose motto was “deeds not words”; and

Whereas, In 1910, Alice Paul returned to the United States to study at the University of Pennsylvania and she joined the NAWSA and was appointed head of the Congressional Committee in charge of working for a federal constitutional amendment granting women the right to vote; and

Whereas, On March 3, 1913, Alice Paul organized a march down Pennsylvania Avenue to coincide with the presidential inauguration of Woodrow Wilson to raise awareness of the women’s suffrage movement; and

Whereas, In 1916, in an effort to focus all of her energy on a national suffrage amendment, Alice Paul formed the National Women’s Party (NWP) and organized “Silent Sentinels” to stand outside of the White House holding banners with messages directed toward President Wilson; and

Whereas, Alice Paul and several other suffragists continued these protests following the entry into World War I by the United States and they were arrested and imprisoned; and

Whereas, Alice Paul and the arrested suffragists were sent to Occoquan Workhouse, a prison in Virginia, where they staged hunger strikes and were forced to endure physical beatings and cold, unsanitary, rat infested cells; and

Whereas, When news of the prison conditions and hunger strikes became known, the press, politicians, and the public began to demand the release of Alice Paul and the rest of the imprisoned suffragists; and

Whereas, In response to the increased public support for the women’s suffrage movement and the public support for Alice Paul and the suffragists, President Wilson announced his support for a suffrage amendment; and

Whereas, On August 18, 1920, the 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution was officially ratified, granting women the right to vote; and

Whereas, In order to honor Alice Paul and her efforts on behalf of the women’s suffrage movement, it is appropriate to designate January 11 of each year as Alice Paul Day in New Jersey; now, therefore,

 

     Be It Resolved by the Senate and General Assembly of the State of New Jersey:

 

1.         January 11 of each year is designated as “Alice Paul Day” in recognition of the leadership of Alice Paul in support of the women’s suffrage movement.

 

2.         The Governor is requested to issue an annual proclamation recognizing January 11 of each year as “Alice Paul Day” and calling upon public officials and the citizens of this State to observe the day with appropriate activities and programs.

 

3.         This joint resolution shall take effect immediately.

 

 

STATEMENT

 

     This joint resolution designates January 11 of each year as “Alice Paul Day.” Born in Mt. Laurel, New Jersey on January 11, 1885, Alice Paul was a prominent and effective advocate for the women’s suffrage movement. As the head of the Congressional Committee in charge of working for a federal suffrage amendment for the National American Woman Suffrage Association, Alice Paul organized a march along Pennsylvania Avenue in support of a suffrage amendment to the United States Constitution.

     In 1916, Alice Paul founded the National Women’s Party in order to establish a national suffrage amendment. While protesting outside of the White House, Alice Paul and other suffragists were arrested and imprisoned. While in prison, Alice Paul was subjected to physical beatings and forced to live in cold, unsanitary, rat infested cells. She organized hunger strikes while in prison and demanded to be treated as a political prisoner. When news of the prison conditions and hunger strikes became known, the press, politicians, and the public demanded that she be released, along with the other imprisoned suffragists. The arrest, imprisonment, and mistreatment of Alice Paul and the suffragists created awareness and support for the Women’s suffrage movement, eventually leading to the ratification of the 19th Amendment.